Arriving Pachacamac


One of the massive Pachacamac Pyramids

One of the massive Pachacamac Pyramids

After our visit to El Salto del Friale to watch some guy dressed as a monk jump off a cliff into raging waters, our tour group headed some 25 miles/40 kilometers south along the coast to the Pachacamac Archeological Site.

Our tour bus

Our tour bus

If you thought the pyramids of Huaca Pucllana were impressive, wait until you get a glimpse of Puchacamac!

Pachacamac-related sites in Peru

This archeological site covers some 2.3 square miles/6 square kilometers, and it is dotted with the remains of massive pyramids, temples, roadways, and buildings.

Pachacamac 3-20-2015 10-48-58 AM

Map of Pachacamac

Atop the highest ground is the Temple of the Sun, which I’ll cover more in depth in a later, separate blog post (you’ll get a glimpse however on this week’s Fun Photo Friday).  You can see the Temple of the Sun depicted at the upper right-hand corner of the 3-D rendering below:

3-D Modelling of the Pachacamac Archeological Site

3-D Modelling of the Pachacamac Archeological Site

Upon arrival to Pachacamac you’ll find the visitors center, which contains some background information as well as replicas of ancient artifacts that were found in the area.

Replica Artifacts

Replica Artifacts

Many of the building at Pachacamac were built by the pre-Incan Ichma Culture sometime between A.D. 1350 and 1400. Here is a detailed replica of Ichma Culture pottery:

Replica Pottery at Pachacamac

Replica Pottery at Pachacamac

There is much to see, do, and photograph here, which is why we’ll be exploring Pachacamac over the next three weeks culminating with a hike high above the surrounding area for some breathtaking views from the Temple of the Sun.  So, until Wednesday, let me leave you with just a taste of what’s in store over these upcoming weeks:

Pachacamac

Pachacamac

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