Tag Archives: Walther

Fun Photo Friday — 1940 Zella-Mehlis Walther PP


1940 Walther PP

1940 Walther PP

Well, it is firearm week.  So of course this week’s Fun Photo Friday had to contain a fun firearm photo session.

1940 Walther PP

1940 Walther PP

It pays to establish a good relationship with your favorite locally owned gun store.  It really does.  Indeed, for a collector it is vitally important to do so.

Zella-Mehlis roll mark

Zella-Mehlis roll mark

Part of that bonding is to convey to your dealer your tastes in collecting.  In my case, it’s a weakness for all things Walther.

Nazi Germany proof marks

Nazi Germany proof marks

What you see pictured here is not particularly rare, except for the condition of this 70-year-old artifact from 1940 Nazi Germany.  This is not a war piece, but rather a commercial version of the venerable 7.65mm/.32 ACP Walther PP double-action/single-action semiautomatic pistol.  It is perhaps the first truly successful DA/SA semiautomatic produced, and it was a mainstay of European military and police forces from its introduction in 1929 well into the 1980s.  Indeed, the shortened PPK version became the weapon of choice for everyone’s favorite fictional MI6 agent, the one with the Double-0 number.

Minor holster wear

Minor holster wear

As you can see, most of the original bluing remains intact with only minor holster wear and a few scratches marring the finish.

Minor holster wear

Minor holster wear

But the pistol did not come alone.  It came with a period-correct AKAH holster as well.

AKAH Holster

AKAH Holster

I took this AKAH to El Paso Saddlery for an examination to see if the leather was in need of maintenance.  It isn’t.

AKAH Holster

AKAH Holster

The boys at El Paso Saddlery said to leave it alone.  The leather is still supple and not in any danger of drying out as long as it is stored properly.

A little history here, if I could read it

A little history here, if I could read it

Unfortunately, the gun is not quite complete.  It came with a period-correct flat-base magazine, but was not accompanied by one with the finger rest extension.  That will have to wait while I find one at a reasonable price.

Period-correct magazine

Period-correct magazine

Internally the Walther PP is sound, and now clean.  I stripped away a lot of accumulated gunk and grime, but I may have a bit more work to do.

Disassembled view with AKAH Holster

Disassembled view with AKAH Holster

The loaded chamber indicator pin doesn’t seem to be under tension.  This could be because of a broken spring, or it could be something as simple as more gunk clogging up the channel above the firing pin even though the firing pin is operating normally.  To make sure I’ll need to do something I’ve not had to do before on any of my many PP-series Walthers, which is to remove the safety drum, firing pin, and loaded chamber indicator assembly.  If the spring is intact and functional, I’ll scrub out the channel and reassemble everything.  If not, it’s time to find a new spring — which I may go ahead and do anyway.

Firing pin and loaded chamber indicator channel

Firing pin and loaded chamber indicator channel

Enjoy one more look at this gorgeous pistol’s internal design:

Disassembled view

Disassembled view

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Latest Acquisition — An Interarms Walther PPK in .380 ACP


Stainless Interarms Walther PPK in .380 ACP (9mm Kurz)

I had hoped to show you my new stainless Interarms Walther .32 ACP (7.65mm) PPK by now, but it’s currently being held by a sheriff department in another state pending a defensive shooting.  Until that investigation is completed and the deal closed between the seller and me, that particular blog will have to wait.  Shame, too, because there were only 5,000 samples of that particular weapon made in that exact caliber before Interarms shut down operations back in the late 1990s.  In other words, it’s a rare beauty.

However, as luck would have it, I found today a close cousin — another stainless Interarms Walther PPK, but this one chambered for the much more popular and vastly more prevalent .380 ACP round (9mm Kurz).  After disassembly, a thorough cleaning, lubrication, and reassembly, here’s what followed me home today:

Disassembled view — the two right-most magazines are actually for the .380 version of the PPK/S rather than the PPK

Stainless steel frame and slide — this particular material was only used in PPK and PPK/S pistols made in Smith & Wesson’s current version and the previous Interarms version manufactured by Ranger Manufacturing; No European Walthers were made in stainless steel.

Close-up of PPK frame and underneath view of the PPK slide; firing pin channel and safety block located on the left-hand side.

Original case with Owner’s Manual and Test Target

Following the conclusion of my series on our recent transatlantic cruise you may expect to see a series of reviews on several firearms — Beretta 84FS Cheetah, Beretta CX4 9mm Carbine with EOTech Holographic Sight, Colt M1991A1, FNH FNX-45, SIG P229 Enhanced Elite, SIG P220 Compact SAS Gen 2, and the SIG P220 Equinox.

But if you’re not into guns, don’t worry.  No more than one such review shall occur in any one week.  We’ll still have plenty of travels to enjoy as well as Fun Photo Friday.

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New in Collection—Yeah . . . It’s Another Walther


But this is a fairly rare one.  First, it’s a true West German-made version of Walther’s iconic PP-series—in this case the PPK/S.  Second, it’s chambered in  .22 LR (5.6mm).  The only thing rarer would be one chambered in .25 ACP (6.35mm ).  And finally, this one comes with the original Interarms case, factory target, owner’s manual, and tools.  You won’t find that combination very often.

We’ve discussed the PPK/S and PPK before, but those pistols were chambered for the .380 ACP and .32 ACP.  And as you’ll recall from that blog article, the PP-series was originally designed for the .32 ACP.  All other subsequent chamberings were afterthoughts to the original intent of the design.

Being a used gun, this one has seen a bit of wear and shows traces of neglect.  I’ve pointed out some of the flaws in the photographs below.  But don’t fear.  There’s a rebluing in this gun’s future.  After that it should regain much of its lost luster.

Just for fun, I also included a comparison photograph next to a Walther P99c AS—the compact version of Walther’s incomparable P99 with it’s revolutionary AS (Anti-Stress) double-action/single-action trigger set in a polymer-framed, striker-fired pistol.  These two weapon designs are separated by sixty-four years of progress (the P99 was designed beginning in 1993 came out around 1997 or so).

The original Walther PP came out in 1929, followed by the smaller PPK version in 1931.  The PPK/S variation dates back to 1968, and is basically a PPK barrel and slide mounted atop the larger PP frame.

I’m so far very happy with this addition to my collection.  I’ll be even happier, I’m sure, when I get to actually fire it and after I’ve had it reblued.

And here are the obligatory photographs:

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